Wednesday, February 3, 2016

This Week: Canadian geese/Canada geese + "Star Wars" on the podcast

Canadian geese/Canada geese
“Canadian geese” would be any old geese that happen to be in Canada. What people usually mean to refer to when they use this phrase is the specific species properly called “Canada geese.”


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https://commonerrorspodcast.wordpress.com/

This week on the podcast it’s more sci-fi movie talk with “Star Wars.”

Wednesday, January 27, 2016

This Week: core/corps/corpse + "Busted" on the podcast + a Paul Brians is shown an interesting menu item

core/corps/corpse
Apples have cores. A corps is an organization, like the Peace Corps. A corpse is a dead body, a carcass.















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https://commonerrorspodcast.wordpress.com/
This week on the podcast it's all about “busted.”

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Paul Brians' latest blog post talks about an unfortunate error discovered by a reader.

Wednesday, January 20, 2016

This week: cut of tea/cup of tea + New Podcast Episode on the Language of 2001: A Space Odyssey

cut of tea/cup of tea
An astounding number of people write “cut of tea” when they mean “cup of tea,” especially in phrases like “not my cut of tea” instead of “not my cup of tea.” This saying is not about fine distinctions between different ways the tea’s been harvested; it just refers to the ordinary vessel from which you drink the stuff.

Is this mistake influenced by the expression “the cut of his jib” or is it just a goofy typo?

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While everyone is Ziggying and discussing “A Space Oddity,” this week on the podcast we are zaggying and talking about the language of Stanley Kubrick’s famous movie whose title served as inspiration for David Bowie.

Wednesday, January 13, 2016

This week: biweekly/semiweekly + New Podcast Episode + New Blog Post

biweekly/semiweekly
Technically, a biweekly meeting occurs every two weeks and a semiweekly one occurs twice a week; but so few people get this straight that your club is liable to disintegrate unless you avoid these words in the newsletter and stick with “every other week” or “twice weekly.” The same is true of “bimonthly” and “semimonthly,” though “biennial” and “semiannual” are less often confused with each other.


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Paul Brians' latest blog post looks at a strange sentence from The Washington Post.

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https://commonerrorspodcast.wordpress.com/
This week on the podcast it's the history of Common Errors in English Usage (Part 2), covering the origins of the Web site and book, including some glimpses into the early days of the World Wide Web.

Wednesday, January 6, 2016

This week: Ceasar/Caesar + New Podcast Episode—The History of Common Errors in English Usage

Ceasar/Caesar
Did you know that German “Kaiser” is derived from the Latin “Caesar” and is pronounced a lot more like it than the English version? We’re stuck with our illogical pronunciation, so we have to memorize the correct spelling. (The Russians messed up the pronunciation as thoroughly as the English, with their “Czar.”) Throughout America thousands of menus are littered with “Ceasar salads,” which should be “Caesar salads”—named after a restaurateur, not the Roman ruler (but they both spelled their names the same way).


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This week on the podcast it's the history of Common Errors in English Usage (Part 1), covering the origins of the Web site and book, including some glimpses into the early days of the World Wide Web.

Thursday, December 31, 2015

year end and year out/year in and year out: Common Errors in English Usage Entry for Thursday, December 31, 2015 + News About the Future of the Calendar

year end and year out/year in and year out 
When something goes on continually, it is traditional to say it happens “year in and year out,” meaning “from the beginning of the year to its end—and so on year after year.”

The mistaken form “year end and year out” doesn’t make sense because “year end” and “year out” both refer to the same part of the year, so no time span is being described.





















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The latest podcast is about changes in style for the coming year.

This is the tenth year of the Common Errors in English Usage calendar. To celebrate, we are bringing back some of our favorite interesting, funny, but sometimes merely silly entries through the years before going on hiatus in 2016. However, look for a weekly mailing with a featured entry and cartoon beginning January 6.

Enjoy the calendar? Buy the book!

Wednesday, December 30, 2015

New Podcast Episode is Up / finalize/finish: Common Errors in English Usage Entry for Wednesday, December 30, 2015

finalize/finish, put into final form 
“Finalize” is very popular among bureaucrats, but many people hate it. Avoid it unless you know that everyone in your environment uses it too.


















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The latest podcast is about changes in style for the coming year.

End-of-year sale on the book: Use the coupon code FIFTEEN to get Common Errors in English Usage 3rd Edition at $4 off the cover price. Order through wmjasco.com.

This is the tenth year of the Common Errors in English Usage calendar. To celebrate, we are bringing back some of our favorite interesting, funny, but sometimes merely silly entries through the years before going on hiatus in 2016.

Enjoy the calendar? Buy the book!