Wednesday, November 30, 2016

This Week: BOOK SALE CONTINUES + Photography on the podcast (part 1) + wheat/whole wheat

wheat/whole wheat
Waiters routinely ask, “Wheat or white?” when bread is ordered, but the white bread is also made of wheat. The correct term is “whole wheat,” in which the whole grain, including the bran and germ, has been used to make the flour. “Whole wheat” does not necessarily imply that no white flour has been used in the bread; most whole wheat breads incorporate some white flour.


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End-of-year sale: Get the book for just $15 through the end of the year (free shipping within the US).



On the podcast this week, we take a holiday from our usual language-centered discussion to talk about photography.

Wednesday, November 23, 2016

This Week: BOOK SALE + Street talk on the podcast (part 2) + reap what you sew/reap what you sow

reap what you sew/reap what you sow
When you plant seeds you sow them. Galatians 6:7 says, “A man reaps what he sows” (harvests what he plants, gets what he deserves). This agricultural metaphor gets mangled frequently into “you reap what you sew.” At best, you might rip what you sew; but you probably wouldn’t want to tell people about it.

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End-of-year sale: Get the book for just $15 through the end of the year (free shipping within the US).



https://commonerrorspodcast.wordpress.com/

On the podcast this week, we once again take it to the streets. If you want to hear a Thanksgiving-themed podcast, you can listen to last year’s offering.

Wednesday, November 16, 2016

This Week: BOOK SALE + Street talk on the podcast (part 1) + working progress/work in progress

working progress/work in progress
If your project isn’t finished yet, it’s not a “working progress” but a “work in progress.”




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End-of-year sale: Get the book for just $15 through the end of the year (free shipping within the US).



https://commonerrorspodcast.wordpress.com/

On the podcast this week, we take it to the streets.

Wednesday, November 9, 2016

This Week: Apostrophe talk on the podcast (part 3) + genius/brilliant

genius/brilliant
In standard English “genius” is a noun, but not an adjective. In slang, people often say things like “Telling Mom your English teacher is requiring the class to get HBO was genius!” The standard way to say this is “was brilliant.”


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https://commonerrorspodcast.wordpress.com/

On the podcast this week, we wrap up our discussion on the apostrophe.

Wednesday, November 2, 2016

This Week: Apostrophe talk on the podcast (part 2) + urine analysis/urinalysis

urine analysis/urinalysis
The technical term for the test you use to kick the druggies off the team is not “urine analysis” but “urinalysis.”

 
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https://commonerrorspodcast.wordpress.com/

On the podcast this week, we continue our discussion on the apostrophe.

Wednesday, October 26, 2016

This Week: Apostrophe talk on the podcast (part 1) + visually impaired + Paul Brians’ latest blog post

visually impaired 
 Many people mistakenly suppose that “visually impaired” is a more polite term than “blind.” But the distinction between these two is simpler: a person without eyesight is blind; a person with vision problems stopping short of total or legal blindness is visually impaired.


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https://commonerrorspodcast.wordpress.com/

On the podcast this week, we give some background on the apostrophe and talk about its use.


Paul Brians’ latest blog post takes measure of how we use language to describe large areas.

Wednesday, October 19, 2016

This Week: Going nuclear (part 3) on the podcast + Confusionism/Confucianism

Confusionism/Confucianism
This spelling error isn’t exactly an English error, but it’s very common among my students. Confucius is the founder of Confucianism. His name is not spelled “Confucious,” and his philosophy is not called “Confusionism.” When you spot the confusion in the latter term, change it quickly to “Confucianism.”



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https://commonerrorspodcast.wordpress.com/

On the podcast this week, we conclude our discussion of the bomb and the arts.